IPv6 on Dell Cloud and Rackspace Cloud Servers

IPv6 is coming – albeit slowly.  While the core Internet is IPv6-capable, getting that plumbed all the way through to your system, be it at home, in your company’s data center, or in a cloud offering, is still elusive.  When waiting isn’t an option, tunneling IPv6 over IPv4 has proven viable, at least for light uses.

Since 2006, I’ve been using the tunnel service provided by SixXS to have IPv6 at home.  Now that I’ve been making more use of cloud servers, first with Dell Cloud with VMware vCloud Datacenter Service, and now adding Rackspace Cloud Servers, I’ve wanted IPv6 connectivity to those servers too.  While both clouds have roadmap plans to add native IPv6 connectivity, I’m a little impatient, and can afford to make the conversion once each is ready with native service.  So, I’ve expanded by my use of SixXS into each of those clouds as well.

As it happens, both Dell Cloud and Rackspace Cloud Servers are network-located in the Dallas, TX area, where SixXS also has a PoP.  That means in both cases there’s only about a 2ms round trip time between my cloud servers and the PoP, which is an acceptable overhead.  In configuring my cloud servers, I have requested a tunnel from SixXS, installed the aiccu program from the Linux distro repositories, and configured the /etc/aiccu.conf file with my credentials and tunnel ID.  Voila – IPv6 connectivity!  A quick update to /etc/sysconfig/ip6tables, and now my services are reachable through both IPv4 and IPv6.  As each tunnel also comes with a whole routed /48 subnet as well, as I stand up more cloud servers in each location, I can route this subnet so I don’t have to configure separate tunnels for each server.

Free IPv6 connectivity for my cloud servers, without waiting for native connectivity.  That’s cool!