s3tools / s3cmd needs a new maintainer

As posted to the s3tools-general mailing list, s3tools maintainer Michal Ludvig is looking for new maintainers to step up to continue the care and feeding of the s3tools / s3cmd application.  s3cmd is widely used, on both Linux and Windows, to publish and maintain content in the Amazon Web Services S3 storage system and CloudFront content distribution network.

I use s3cmd for two primary purposes:

  1. as Fedora Mirror Wrangler, I use it within Fedora Infrastructure to maintain mirrors within S3 in each region for the benefit of EC2 users running Fedora or using the EPEL repository on top of RHEL or a derivative.  Fedora has mirrors in us-east-1, us-west-1 and -2, and eu-west-1 right now, and may add the other regions over time.
  2. for my own personal web site, I offload storage of static historical pictures and movies so that they are served from economical storage and not consuming space on my primary web server.

I congratulate Michal for recognizing when he no longer has the time to commit to regular maintenance of such an important project, and to begin looking for contributors who can carry out that responsibility more effectively.  While I’ve submitted a few patches in support of the Fedora Infrastructure mirror needs, I know that I don’t have the time to take on that added responsibility right now either.

If you use s3cmd, or have contributed to s3cmd, and feel you could make the time commitment to be the next maintainer, you’ll find an active contributor base and dedicated user base to help you move the project forward.

 

SELinux on a Rackspace Cloud Server

After a long time hosting my personal web site at WestHost, I finally decided to move it to another cloud provider – a Rackspace Cloud Server.  This move gives me a chance to run Fedora 16, as I do at home everywhere, and which is more than capable of serving a few light traffic domains, personal mail and mailing lists, and email for our neighborhood youth basketball league.

One thing that surprised me though was that the default Fedora 16 image provided by Rackspace in their smallest configuration (256GMB RAM, 10GB storage) had SELinux disabled, and no selinux-policy package installed.  Being a big fan of Mark Cox’s work reporting on vulnerabilities in RHEL, and Josh Bressers work leading the Fedora Security Response Team, it just didn’t feel right running an internet-facing Fedora server without having SELinux enabled.

This was easily enough resolved by installing the selinux-policy-targeted package, editing /etc/grub.conf to remove selinux=0 from the kernel command line, enabling the configuration in /etc/selinux/config, and restarting the server.  After a few minutes of autorelabeling, all is well and good.

I’m sure SELinux can get in the way of some application deployments.  It’s easiest for Rackspace to keep it disabled, letting experienced folks like myself enable it if they want.  I would have preferred it to be enabled by default, as there’s always the option to disable it later or run in permissive mode.

Because I run a few mailing lists using mailman, across multiple domains, I of course wanted to run several separate instances of mailman, one for each domain.  Fedora has a SELinux-aware mailman package just a quick yum install away.  The problem is, the SELinux file context rules are written expecting only one instance of mailman per server.  That’s when I remembered a recent blog post by Dutch where he had patched the mailman spec and config files to build separate mailman-${sitename} RPMs, each with their own correct SELinux contexts.  Very cool, and exactly what I needed.  Well, almost – he did his work on EL6, I’m running Fedora 16, but close enough (see his blog comments for the few changes necessary on F16).  Thanks to Dutch, I’ve got a fully SELinux-secured web and mail server with separate mailman instances for each domain.

Next time you build a Rackspace Cloud Server running Fedora, take an extra couple minutes and enable SELinux.  The site you save may be your own!

FUDCon Blacksburg videos

I shot videos of several of the presentations at the Fedora User and Developer Conference yesterday.  For your viewing pleasure:

  • “State of Fedora” from the Fedora Project Leader, Jared Smith [ogg]
  • Mike McGrath, team lead for OpenShift, demoing OpenShift [ogg]
  • Jon Masters and Chris Tyler, on the ARM architecture in Fedora [ogg]. ARM is a secondary architecture today.  By Fedora 18, with your help, it needs to become a primary architecture.
  • David Nalley presented on CloudStack, which is aiming for Fedora 17 inclusion. [ogg]
  • Dan Prince and Russell Bryant giving an introduction to OpenStack [ogg]
  • Mo Morsi presenting the Aeolus cloud management project [ogg]

[Update 1/18/2012] I was able to upload all the videos to YouTube.  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2BAA7FF83E6482C2
is a playlist with all 6.

Northwest Austin Youth Basketball registration

Northwest Austin Youth Basketball Association (NWAYBA) registration deadline is only 3 weeks away.  Register your 1st grader through High School player, and join us on the courts this Fall.  Registration forms must be postmarked by October 16, but I’d appreciate it if you’d mail them sooner.  Somehow I got roped onto the NWAYBA Board, as the Registrar.  We’re expecting 400 players again this year. I’d prefer not to deal with 300 applications in the last week.

Central Texas Wildfire Relief Food and Goods Drive

On Saturday, September 24th, the boys of Cub Scout Pack 2 will be in the Doss Teachers’ Parking lot from 8a until 12p for final collections before delivering the food and goods to those in need. Firefighers with a Fire Engine from the City of Austin Fire Department will join us at Doss from 9-11am, work permitting.

Please demonstrate the generosity and caring of our neighborhood by joining Cub Scout Pack 2 in collecting the following needed items for those impacted by the wildfires of the past several weeks:

  • Canned food items
  • Dishwashing soap
  • Diapers and wipes (all sizes)
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Eye drops
  • Bandages
  • Neosporin/triple anti-biotic cream
  • gift cards or cash which will be converted to HEB gift cards

Boys from Pack 2 have been and will be in uniform at Doss each day September 19th through the 23rd to collect your donations. So far several truckloads of items have been collected.

Google Voice: Why do I need a home phone?

For the past 3 months I’ve been using Google Voice, and I must say, I like it.  But I’m not exactly using it as intended.

I’ve had the same home phone number for 10 years.  A lot of people have that number.  Not a lot of people call it (what that says about my popularity I don’t really want to know), and we don’t make that many outgoing calls a month, but the thought of changing it everywhere is daunting.  More so for anyone with a number for even longer.  I’ve started doing so, but only opportunistically.

What to do?  I don’t want to give up my home number, and I can’t yet transfer my number to Google Voice.  And in theory, I get a discount on my phone/cable/internet by having all three, they’d charge even more for having just two.

My trick?  Time Warner offers unlimited free call forwarding.  So, my home number forwards to GV.  GV then forwards to my cell phone, email, Celeste’s cell phone, etc.  I dropped the voicemail from TW, as now GV takes care of that.  And I can drop the long distance with TW and use GV for that too.  Everything works great.

At some point, when I can transfer my home number to GV and have two numbers for the account (old home number and new GV number I’ve been giving out), and if TW’s rates change again so it’s cheaper to drop their phone service, I will.  Or they will get enough competition to realize that for a couple dozen calls a month, charging $$ for phone service won’t work and they just throw it in for free.  Here’s to hoping.

How many social networking sites do you use?

Daily I look at Facebook, Twitter, Identi.ca, LinkedIn, Yammer, and probably a few more I use far less often.  But what do you do when a friend or colleague invites you to use YASNS (yet another social networking site)?

I’ve been sitting on an invite to Namyz for ages.  It was sent by a friend of mine, and I don’t want to snuff his enthusiasm for this particular site, but I don’t really want yet another of these to keep track of.  Same goes with Plaxo.  I’m sure they’re wonderful, but really, how many can one person be expected to use?  What’s the etiquette for saying “no thanks to Namyz, but if you’d care to send me a LinkedIn invite, I’d accept that?”