Linux Plumbers Conference 2010 – User-visible Network Problems track links

At Linux Plumbers Conference in Cambridge this morning, we will be covering several networking issues that have specific implications on userspace programs or system administrator behavior.  Links below are to join us (virtually).  In addition, video of the sessions will be available following.

Topics and their discussion leaders:

  • Challenges in Mobile Networking – Dan Williams
  • Network Device Naming – Matt Domsch
  • Scaling techniques in the stack for servers with high connection rates – Ying Cai
  • Simplifying network configuration for VMs by harmonizing multiple Bridging, QOS, DCB and CNA implementations – Shyam Iyer

To join:

IRC: #lpc2010-thomas-paine on FreeNode

Etherpad (live note taking): http://etherpad.osuosl.org/lpc2010-user-visible-network-issues

Slide decks: http://domsch.com/linux/lpc2010/

Twitter and Identi.ca: Use hashtag #lpc2010

LPC Wiki links:

Fedora Elections – it starts now

You know it’s election season.  The commercials are unavoidable.  Candidates kissing babies.  “The other guys say…”.  Shameless promotion and pandering.  Division and false dichotomies rule the airwaves.

However, in Fedora-land, the tenor is quite calm, welcoming, and actively non-partisan, even though we have several elections going on.

First (timewise), the code name for Fedora 15.  This is the quirky name that we give each release, that both serves as inspiration for the artwork that our fantastic design team generates, and that ties our releases together, both backwards in history to our Red Hat Linux roots and continuing on with each subsequent Fedora release.  Each code name has a non-obvious link to the predecessor release, while leaving wide open the range of future release names.

After sifting through 50 suggestions, and trimming the list for possible trademark conflicts, we are left with 5 names that any Fedora member can vote for:

– Asturias
– Blarney
– Sturgis
– Lovelock
– Pushcart

Take a moment to reflect on the nature of each of the above, and then vote for your favorite.

Second, we have started the nomination process for the semi-annual election of seats on the Fedora Project Board and the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo), and for the annual election of members of the Fedora Ambassadors Steering Committee (FAMSCo).  These are important, highly visible, volunteer positions which guide the Project as a whole, the technical details of the “product” of Fedora the distro, and coordinate the activities of our outreach and evangelism teams.  Please consider running for one of these offices by nominating yourself, or, you may nominate someone you would like to see be elected (with their consent of course).

For my part, I have had the pleasure of serving on the Board for the last 5 years since its inception.  We have come a long way during my tenure, from the elimination of the dreaded “Core vs Extras” distinction, to the creation of the Spins and Remixes processes that let anyone, anywhere, use Fedora for any purpose, to the creation of the Stable Updates policy, and finally a Vision Statement we can all get behind.  While there is plenty more to be done, it’s time for me to step aside from policy-making, and assist a new Board in delivering on these visions.  I thank the community for allowing me to serve on the Board thus far, and am counting on you to support the newly elected Board, FESCo, and FAMSco, in continuing to develop and deliver a fantastic distribution.

Linux Plumbers Conference: User-visible Network Issues Mini-Conf

At the Linux Plumbers Conference November 3-5, 2010 in Cambridge,
MA, we have a half-day mini-conference set aside on Thursday
morning (so as to follow immediately, but not conflict with netconf)
to discuss “User-visible Network Issues” – challenges that users face,
that could benefit from both userspace and kernel enhancements to make
their lives easier.

Accepted topics are:

* Challenges in Mobile Networking
Challenges that we have with networking in the mobile space.
Led by Dan Williams

* Network Device Naming
Which of my NICs is eth0?
Led by Matt Domsch

* Scaling techniques in the stack for servers with high connection rates
This talk will describe some techniques for scaling front end
servers. In particular, we will describe the the use of SO_REUSEPORT
in scaling servers for high connection rates with a single listening
port.
Led by Ying Cai

* Simplifying network configuration for VMs by harmonizing multiple Bridging, QOS, DCB and CNA implementations
Led by Shyam Iyer, with John Fastabend

While I’m sure the individual topics will generate great discussion,
it will be vital that members of the netdev community be present to
represent the kernel developers’ perspectives on the problems and to
help brainstorm solutions.  Most of these topics have significant
kernel components to them, and without additional kernel developer
participation, I fear we would just be talking to ourselves, but no
real progress made.  I invite you to attend LPC, and this
mini-conf in particular, and lend your expertise.

If you would attend LPC, except that the conference fee is a burden,
please let me know.  I have at least one pass available for mini-conf
participants.

Dell at LinuxCon Boston

For the second year in a row, Dell engineers will be on hand at the Linux Foundation’s LinuxCon conference in Boston next week.  While I don’t get to fly a helicopter in the Penguin Bowl this year, we’ll have plenty of face time with the engineers and enthusiasts on hand.

On Wednesday at 10:30am, I’ll be presenting on Network Device Naming, which simplifies this:

PowerEdge R610 with 8 Ethernet ports

by letting the system administrator use better names for their network ports than “eth0”.   Can you guess which is eth0 in that picture?  (Hint: it might be green, it might be red, it might be orange and it may change from time to time.)

Shyam Iyer  follows me at 11:30am, presenting “Storage Provisioning with iSCSI for Virtualized Environments”, which describes the work he has been doing with the Open-iSCSI and libvirt teams to simplify iSCSI storage use by virtual machines, to take advantage of all the great hardware acceleration our EqualLogic arrays provide.

On Thursday at 2pm, I return to the stage in a panel moderated by Matt Asay, COO of Canonical, titled “What’s Next for Linux”, alongside James Bottomley of Novell, David Recordon of Facebook, and Ravi Simhambhatla of Virgin America.   I’m especially interested to be on this panel, as my cohorts are pushing the limits of computing, often with Dell’s help, and simultaneously Dell is active in the new worlds they’re creating.

See you in Boston next week!

Interview with Jared Smith, new Fedora Project Leader

I thought this was a well-done interview by Henry Kingman of Linux.com, welcoming new Fedora Project Leader Jared Smith.

I’ve been fortunate to serve on the Fedora Project Board since 2006, and to have the opportunity to work with several FPLs (Max and Paul directly, and their predecessors Michael, Christian, and Greg in various capacities), and I look forward to working with Jared even more now.  He brings a wealth of experience, talent, and enthusiasm that’s contagious.

I’m also quite pleased with the way the transitions between FPLs have been handled.  Both Max and Paul knew for themselves when they were ready for new challenges – not that they were “burned out” (e.g. CATB lesson #5), or that they were no longer being effective, but realized that they could apply their talents towards Fedora in new ways, while opening new opportunities for another talented and respected contributor.  That’s a big part of building a healthy community.

Linux Against Poverty event on Saturday

On Saturday morning, in Austin, TX, a couple dozen local Linux enthusiasts will gather at Union Park to receive donated computers and parts, refurbish what is usable, recycle what is not, and in the end produce 300+ working Linux systems to be given to Central Texas children who would otherwise not have access to a computer at home. Linux Against Poverty, a program started in 2009 by Lynn Bender of GeekAustin and Ken Starks of The Helios Project, collected over 200 computers at last year’s event, and has even loftier goals for this year’s event.

Perhaps you’ve recently upgraded a home system, and haven’t gotten around to recycling that still usable but maybe a little older system. What better way to put it to use than to donate it to Linux Against Poverty (and get a tax deduction in the process), where it will be refurbished and put to good use for local area schoolchildren?

Computers and parts can be dropped off on Saturday, June 19, at the Union Park restaurant, 6th St. between Nueces and Rio Grande, between 11am and 6pm. Volunteers will help you unload the computer from your car, and give you a tax deductible receipt.

Fedora Elections – Go Vote!

It’s that time of year again. Fedora is holding elections for 3 seats on the Board, and for 5 seats on the Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo). I am very exited by the caliber of contributors who have volunteered their time to serve on these committees, some looking for their first elected leadership role, some looking to continue or redouble their involvement.

I look forward to serving with the new Board members as we continue to map out the high-level goals for Fedora.

Please take a look at the slate of candidates, review the questionnaire answers and the Town Hall logs, make up your mind, and Go Vote!

New uefivars project leverages 9-year-old efibootmgr work

Finnbarr P. Murphy (fpmurphy) posted on his blog yesterday about his new project, uefivars, to retrieve and display information about UEFI variables. UEFI is the new firmware standard, replacing legacy BIOS over time, which is present on Dell 11G PowerEdge servers today. fpmurphy’s work is based largely on my own efibootmgr project which I started back in 2001 when first working on EFI for the Itanium processor. I’m glad to see renewed interest in this work as more people get exposed to UEFI on new systems. Perhaps it’s time, 9 years later, for bits of efibootmgr to turn into a library for use by applications like uefivars.

Fedora mailing list procmail recipe

In honor of Fedora moving its mailing lists this weekend, here’s a little procmail recipe to file each incoming mailing list stream into its own folder.  Fedora lists get a folder prefix of ‘fedora-‘, while all other mailman-handled lists simply get the list name, with whitespace and the @domain part stripped off.

:0 H
* ^X-BeenThere:
{
BEENTHERE=`formail -xX-BeenThere: | sed -e 's/@.*//;s/^[ \t]*//'`
:0 H
* ^X-BeenThere: .*lists.fedoraproject.org
$HOME/Mail/fedora-$BEENTHERE
:0 E
$HOME/Mail/$BEENTHERE
}